The College received $96,000 in grants to support scholarship, education, and students

Recently, the College received grants to support student scholarships and improved instructional design.

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust provided a $71,000 matching grant to establish an educational technology design lab, including a portable computer lab, located in the College’s Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

The Trust awarded a 1:1 matching grant. Once the match is raised, the CTL will use these resources to provide faculty with tools, training, and support to shift a number of courses to a hybrid design that combines online digital technologies with face-to-face teaching to support increased student success.

A portable computer lab containing 20 laptops will be used to train faculty, as well as increase faculty’s implementation of digital technology with students in the place-based classroom.

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust’s mission is to enrich the quality of life in the Pacific Northwest by providing grants and enrichment programs to organizations seeking to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual, and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways.

A $5,000 grant from the Zimmerman Family Foundation will support the College’s educational technology design lab and studio as well.

“The Zimmerman Family Foundation’s grant moves the College closer to our $71,000 goal to realize a matching grant from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust,” said Dr. Aaron McMurray, Vice President for Advancement. “The educational technology design lab will assist professors in diversifying course delivery formats from face-to-face to hybrid and online class configurations.”

The Foundation is dedicated to supporting organizations that inspire education, literary, scientific, and spiritual growth. All of which will be achieved through the increased implantation of digital technology in the classroom.

The $20,000 grant from the William H. & Mary L. Bauman Foundation  supports the Act Six Leadership and Scholarship Initiative’s Urban Service Track at Warner Pacific. Act Six is Oregon’s only full-tuition, full-need urban leadership scholarship.

The Urban Service Track model is a tailored scholarship and leadership program designed to help under-prepared but talented and highly motivated high school scholar-leaders succeed in achieving their higher education goals.

The Bauman Foundation was established in 1992 following the death of Bill Bauman, owner of Bauman Sawmill, which later became part of Willamette Industries and then Weyerhaeuser Corp. The Foundation’s primary purpose is to support children and youth, and evangelical churches and organizations.

“I am so appreciative of the William H. & Mary L. Bauman Foundation’s generous and continued support of this important initiative at Warner Pacific College,” said President Andrea Cook. “Our Act Six Scholars continue to make an impact on campus, in the community, and in their homes; this grant will truly have a positive impact on the lives of Warner Pacific students and the greater Portland community.”

For each Act Six Scholar, Warner Pacific provides a scholarship, supplementing federal and state aid, to cover full-tuition for two years as well as room and board for all four years. These scholarship funds are raised entirely by Warner Pacific through grant awards and private contributions, such as the funds granted by the William H. & Mary L. Bauman Foundation.